After an initial career as commercial pilot, Daniel studied psychology. Since then, he has worked as accident investigator with the Swedish Civil Aviation Administration, as a Human Factors consultant with Dedale (France), Safety innovation leader in engineering, construction and mining, and been engaged in industrial safety research in Sweden, France and Australia.  Daniel is also the founder of www.safetydifferently.com

After an initial career as commercial pilot, Daniel studied psychology. Since then, he has worked as accident investigator with the Swedish Civil Aviation Administration, as a Human Factors consultant with Dedale (France), Safety innovation leader in engineering, construction and mining, and been engaged in industrial safety research in Sweden, France and Australia.

 Daniel is also the founder of www.safetydifferently.com

Daniel Hummerdal

Director of Safety Innovation

Brisbane

+61 419 122 172

Email

 

After presenting some findings from running focus groups on site, one of the truckies came up to me and said: “Let me know if you need any help in assessing effectiveness or placing the lighting towers. I’ve got a master’s degree in lighting. I can help." 

So there was this truck operator, who up until that point had been defined by the role and responsibility that the organisation had given him: to operate a truck. But his potential was clearly much bigger than that. And he was keen to contribute more. This experience triggered a question and a perspective that I have explored since: That people are the solution.

 
Marc began his career working with not for profits and large private and public sector organisations facilitating performance improvements, focusing on strategy, people engagement and enabling leaders. Creativity and different thinking have been at the heart of building more effective leaders and teams. Marc has founded and led several successful ventures, including an incubator for small business start ups, a large national workplace psychology and organisational practice and a thriving Workplace Health and Safety consulting to high risk and complex organisations. Along the way Marc has completed a Bachelor of Social Studies, covering psychology, sociology and political science, a Masters in Occupational Health and Safety and is currently undertaking research into organisational decision making and performance. Marc is recognised as a highly skilled safety and work practitioner, facilitator, and is the Chief Enabler at Art of Work.

Marc began his career working with not for profits and large private and public sector organisations facilitating performance improvements, focusing on strategy, people engagement and enabling leaders. Creativity and different thinking have been at the heart of building more effective leaders and teams. Marc has founded and led several successful ventures, including an incubator for small business start ups, a large national workplace psychology and organisational practice and a thriving Workplace Health and Safety consulting to high risk and complex organisations. Along the way Marc has completed a Bachelor of Social Studies, covering psychology, sociology and political science, a Masters in Occupational Health and Safety and is currently undertaking research into organisational decision making and performance. Marc is recognised as a highly skilled safety and work practitioner, facilitator, and is the Chief Enabler at Art of Work.

Marc McLaren

Chief Enabler

Sydney

+61 412 677 232

Email

 

A conversation that still rings in my mind is one with a person who was busily pre-filling a number of hazard inspections for the day during a pre-start meeting. He proudly described how he knew exactly what to look for and more importantly what his supervisor who collected the forms expected to see. It seemed what was once intended as a good risk management practice had now become a pointless tick and flick exercise. 

It started me thinking about how we can shift the focus to enabling people to take responsibility for their work environments, rather than meeting bureaucratic accountabilities. 

 
Kelvin is a strategic systems thinker with experience in Human Factors and organizational re-engineering. He developed his systems thinking approach working in the military aviation environment for 10 years for the Royal Australian Air Force. Following this, for 10 years, he led a systems and risk management program across Asia Pacific and Europe with Compass Group Plc, the world’s largest support service company.  More recently he was working for Sinclair Knight Merz as the Global General Manager for Safety and Wellness,  to deliver an international leading program for health safety environment and community (HSEC) in the engineering and project management business. Kelvin worked with the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care to develop the national accreditation system for all health care providers across Australia. He also worked with the UK National Health Service Institute for Innovation and Improvement to deliver the Productive Leader and Productive Ward programs in Australia and New Zealand. Formerly he was the Director of Clinical Quality and Safety for NSW Health, responsible for leading the development and implementation of the state-wide clinical quality and patient safety framework standards guidelines, and indicators to improve clinical health care safety and quality for patients of NSW the public health system.  He was responsible for shaping the state and national agendas for clinical health care safety and quality through provision of expert advice to the NSW Health Management Board and the NSW Minister of Health. Currently he holds board positions with the Food Safety Information Council and the Art of Work. He is also a committee member with the Safety Institute of Australia.  

Kelvin is a strategic systems thinker with experience in Human Factors and organizational re-engineering. He developed his systems thinking approach working in the military aviation environment for 10 years for the Royal Australian Air Force. Following this, for 10 years, he led a systems and risk management program across Asia Pacific and Europe with Compass Group Plc, the world’s largest support service company. 

More recently he was working for Sinclair Knight Merz as the Global General Manager for Safety and Wellness,  to deliver an international leading program for health safety environment and community (HSEC) in the engineering and project management business.

Kelvin worked with the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care to develop the national accreditation system for all health care providers across Australia. He also worked with the UK National Health Service Institute for Innovation and Improvement to deliver the Productive Leader and Productive Ward programs in Australia and New Zealand.

Formerly he was the Director of Clinical Quality and Safety for NSW Health, responsible for leading the development and implementation of the state-wide clinical quality and patient safety framework standards guidelines, and indicators to improve clinical health care safety and quality for patients of NSW the public health system.  He was responsible for shaping the state and national agendas for clinical health care safety and quality through provision of expert advice to the NSW Health Management Board and the NSW Minister of Health.

Currently he holds board positions with the Food Safety Information Council and the Art of Work. He is also a committee member with the Safety Institute of Australia.  

Kelvin Genn

Managing Director

Melbourne

+61 418 380 436

Email

 

 

Recently I was studying Google’s management philosophy where I was struck by one of their principles: “make mistakes well”. On initial presentation, this would seem to be counter intuitive, yet it is hard to dismiss when examining the success of the Google enterprise. Surely, “making mistakes well”, is an oxymoron? Over recent years we have sought to crush failure in our organisations, and this has resulted in burgeoning bureaucracy with the resulting diminution of innovation. Disruption in business is revolutionising the way that we work and deliver services. It throws the rules out, and reinvents the way work is done by focussing on the outcome.  

 
Helen has over 10 years’ experience working in safety across a wide range of industries, including construction, manufacturing, recycling and government. She has a degree in Health and Safety management and a strong passion for changing perceptions of the industry as well as encouraging businesses to connect with their people to harness an understanding of what work really is like. Helen sits on the review board for the UK industry magazine, SHP. She is known for her interest in reducing bureaucracy and for her ability in challenging and supporting businesses with their transformational journey between traditional safety and Safety Differently.

Helen has over 10 years’ experience working in safety across a wide range of industries, including construction, manufacturing, recycling and government. She has a degree in Health and Safety management and a strong passion for changing perceptions of the industry as well as encouraging businesses to connect with their people to harness an understanding of what work really is like.

Helen sits on the review board for the UK industry magazine, SHP. She is known for her interest in reducing bureaucracy and for her ability in challenging and supporting businesses with their transformational journey between traditional safety and Safety Differently.

Helen Rawlinson

Managing Director UK

London

+44 7821 753504

Email

I asked a plumber if he could teach me how he connects the pipes. He stopped for a second, looking confused, put down his tools and said ‘you can’t want to know that, what are you really here for?’.

Our people are not used to being asked how they create success, they are instead used to being controlled and told what, and how, to do things. We normally only ask questions to search for deviations, we don’t try and understand variances or successes created by our people.

This is why I help businesses to connect to the knowledge their people have. Systems don’t create safety, people do.